Adriana Corral’s Unearthed: Desenterrado

Culture & Identity  •  Grants

Adriana Corral, Unearthed: Desenterrado (2018). Site-specific installation at Rio Vista Farm, Socorro, Texas. Flagpole: 60 feet; Flag: cotton, 18 x 30 feet. © 2018 Adriana Corral. Photo: Courtesy of Adriana Corral and Black Cube.
Adriana Corral, Unearthed: Desenterrado (2018). Site-specific installation at Rio Vista Farm, Socorro, Texas. Flagpole: 60 feet; Flag: cotton, 18 x 30 feet. © 2018 Adriana Corral. Photo: Courtesy of Adriana Corral and Black Cube.

Staniar Gallery at Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee University, 204 W Washington St, Lexington, VA 24450
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In her socially engaged practice Texas-based artist Adriana Corral investigates universal themes of loss, human rights violations, concealment, and memory. Her rigorous research-based practice and solicitous process draws from the fields of anthropology, journalism, gender studies, and human rights legal studies. For this body of work, Corral draws on her extensive research into the historical treatment of Mexican manual laborers and farm-workers who passed through official U.S. processing centers in the early- and mid-twentieth century.

Artist Talk & Reception: April 23, 2019 at 5:30pm
A Conversation with Curator Steve Velasquez

Artist Adriana Corral will discuss her work on view at Washington and Lee University’s Staniar Gallery. The conversation with Curator Steve Velasquez will be followed by a reception (lecture & reception free and open to the public).

Corral was awarded the Joan Mitchell Foundation Emerging Artist Grant and National Association of Latino Arts and Culture Grant. She is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Artist in Residence grant and was named one of the “18 Artists to Watch” by Modern Painters. She attended the International Artist-in-Residence at Artpace, the Künstlerhaus Bethanien Residency in Berlin, and was a fellow at Black Cube: A Nomadic Contemporary Art Museum.

Steve Velasquez is a Curator for the Division of Cultural and Community Life, National Museum of American History. He was co-curator for the Bracero Oral History Project and associated traveling exhibit, Bittersweet Harvest: The Bracero Program 1942-1964.

This project was funded in part by a grant from Virginia Humanities.

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